Which farmhouse was it? And what’s it got to do with Bob Hope? Funny you should ask….

Copyright © 2012 by Joseph Ditta (joseph.ditta@gmail.com)

In honor of the 70th anniversary of its creation this month, I hung a mystery painting above my bed. It doesn’t look terribly mysterious, and I’m sure those of you with a trained eye might say it isn’t even a very skillful picture. It shows a pleasant if somewhat lopsided wood-framed house set snugly amidst a riot of blooming shrubs. An empty stool beside a small basket near the stoop suggests the occupant has slipped inside to escape the summer heat. We can almost hear cicadas droning from the shady trees behind the house.

“Neck Road Farm House, Brooklyn, N.Y., painted by Louis Saphier, July 1942″ (Collection of Joseph Ditta)

The painting and its maker are identified on back: “neck road / farm house / Brooklyn / N.Y. / painted by / Louis Saphier / July 1942.” What makes it so mysterious? Try as I might — and believe me, I’ve tried — I cannot discover where this house stood.

In 1945, just three years after Saphier painted this farmhouse of clearly Dutch-American design – instantly recognizable by its ski-sloped roof overhanging the front porch — the historian Maud Esther Dilliard published Old Dutch Houses of Brooklyn, a survey of the borough’s surviving structures in that distinctive style. As she lamented,

It was not so long ago that many of [the] houses [of Brooklyn's original settlers], and the houses of their children and grandchildren, were standing, but modern business is causing these old buildings fast to disappear. In order that their early owners, the founders of Kings County, may not be forgotten in the hurly-burly of twentieth-century Brooklyn, I have written the stories of all the ancient dwellings which are now in existence — or were at the time their photographs were taken.

Dilliard recorded just four Dutch houses on Gravesend Neck Road:

  • No. 27: Van Sicklen House [Dilliard mistakenly calls this 17]
  • No. 110: Abraham Emans House
  • No. 424: Agnes Lake House [some sources give this as 420]
  • No. 1240: Voris-Shepard House [Dilliard mistakenly calls this 1040]

Only No. 27, the Van Sicklen House (better known as the Hicks-Platt or “Lady Moody” House), stands today. No. 110, the Abraham Emans (or Emmons) House, disappeared between 1945 and 1951, and the Voris-Shepard House, at 1240, was demolished for an apartment building by 1961. None of these had the same layout as Saphier’s farmhouse, but Agnes Lake’s, at 424 (or 420) Neck Road, which was replaced by 1956, came very close. It stood on the south side of the street, and its rear facade bore the correct profile — the three-bay-wide Dutch portion to the left, an addition to the right, and a chimney between — but we do not know if it had dormer windows. (Its north, or street, facade, was “Victorianized” around 1890 through the addition of the tower seen in this 1931 photograph.)

So which house did Saphier paint? Did it vanish between July 1942 and the publication of Dilliard’s book in 1945? Actually, the margin is even narrower: Dilliard published a serialized version of her text in Long Island Forum between November 1943 and March 1945. The structures she covered in both journal and book are the same, so the building Saphier painted, if indeed it was an undocumented Dutch farmhouse on Gravesend Neck Road, would have disappeared in the sixteen months between July 1942 and November 1943, when Dilliard began her series.

From at least 1925 until his death in 1954, Saphier lived at 1544 East 17th Street, between Avenues O and P. Assuming he traveled south down East 17th Street that day back in July 1942, one wonders which direction he turned upon reaching Neck Road. In the 1920s Eugene L. Armbruster photographed practically every Dutch farmhouse then standing in Brooklyn; combing through his shots along the length of Neck Road has not revealed an obvious candidate for the one Saphier captured. The 1939-1941 tax photographs at the New York City Department of Records and Information Services (a.k.a. the Municipal Archives) might include the house closer to the period Saphier painted it, but searching them will have to wait until I find the time or the Municipal Archives digitizes the series, whichever comes first. Maybe Saphier simply painted from memory a long-vanished house he recalled from his walks. Who knows?

The artist himself, while not completely unknown, is not terribly well documented either. Incidentally, his son, James L. Saphier (1907-1974), was for nearly forty years Bob Hope’s business agent. In 1945 the elder Saphier did a lifelike portrait of Hope which sold at auction a few years back for $20,800.

Perhaps from its presence above my bed at night Saphier’s farmhouse painting will seep into my dreams and subconsciously supply the location of this lost corner of Gravesend.

Louis J. Saphier (1875-1954), portrait of Bob Hope, 1945.

Copyright © 2012 by Joseph Ditta (joseph.ditta@gmail.com)

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3 Comments

Filed under art, Bob Hope, Families, Hicks family, Louis Saphier, Maud Esther Dilliard, Van Sicklen family

3 responses to “Which farmhouse was it? And what’s it got to do with Bob Hope? Funny you should ask….

  1. Gale

    I think it’s the “Willtse” house with the “Lady Moody”/Van Siclin house in the background to the right. Both were on Neck Road. The proportions (narrowness) of the Willtse house are correct as is the location of the two buildings in relation to one another even if the Saphier took artistic license in depicting the doors and windows. Also the “Moody House” does have Colonial Revival dormers. Saphier may have been working from a photo to create an idealized scene.

    • Thanks very much for taking the time to read this, Gale! (I’m assuming you’re the Gale I know!). I ruled out the Wiltse House (at 15-17 Neck Road) for a few reasons:

      1. It was very narrow, only two bays wide (door plus window), not three.
      2. Its chimney stood against the wall that ran perpendicular to the front entrance, unlike the one in Saphier’s painting.
      3. While it did eventually gain a dormer, it was one “super dormer,” rather than two (see Armbruster’s 1922 photo at .
      http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?705840f). It also had a dormer on the rear roof (just visible in the lower left photo at http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?705848f), but the roof did not overhang on that side, and there was a low extension on that facade.
      4. It was demolished around 1930 for the schoolyard of P.S. 95.

  2. Pingback: Saphier’s “Neck Road Farm House”: Which Farmhouse Is It? | Sheepshead Bay News Blog

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